I recently kept getting this problem in Firefox:

Screen capture of error message in Firefox
Are you seeing this a lot when using Firefox / Iceweasel / etc?

If you use Firefox and have recently come across this error, fear not.  This intention of this page is to resolve these errors once and for all!

There are a few key steps to resolving it:

  1. Clear Cookies & Cache
  2. Use System Proxy
  3. Disable all Add-ons
  4. Close and restart browser
  5. Try again

 

The instructions provide clues, but don’t spell out, how to set up org2blog for multiple blogs. https://github.com/punchagan/org2blog

(setq org2blog/wp-blog-alist 
  '(("wordpress" :url "http://username.wordpress.com/xmlrpc.php"
     :username "username"
     :default-title "Hello World"
     :default-categories ("org2blog" "emacs")
     :tags-as-categories nil) 
    ("my-blog" :url "http://username.server.com/xmlrpc.php"
     :username "admin")))

But what if you don’t want to specify your username and password in this multi-site set-up?

The answer lies in expanding on the elisp provided.

(let 

 (creds-stevedowe creds-warpuni creds-status)
 (add-to-list 'auth-sources "~/.netrc") 
 
 (setq creds-stevedowe (auth-source-user-and-password "stevedowe.me")) 
 (setq creds-warpuni (auth-source-user-and-password "warpuni.com")) 
 (setq creds-status (auth-source-user-and-password "status.warphost.net"))

 (setq org2blog/wp-blog-alist 
  `( ("stevedowe.me"
      :url "https://dowe.io/xmlrpc.php"
      :default-categories ("me" "process" "things" "world")
      :tags-as-categories nil
      :username ,(car creds-stevedowe)
      :password ,(cadr creds-stevedowe)) 

     ("warpuni.com"
      :url "https://warpuni.com/xmlrpc.php"
      :default-categories ("Analytics","BioData","FreeSoftware","Internet","Mobile","News","Productivity","Security","Social" "Support")
      :tags-as-categories nil
      :username ,(car creds-warpuni)
      :password ,(cadr creds-warpuni)) 

     ("status.warphost.net"
      :url "https://status.warphost.net/xmlrpc.php"
      :tags-as-categories nil
      :username ,(car creds-status)
      :password ,(cadr creds-status)))))

[ This is a legacy post. Some details may no longer be relevant to modern software implementations. ]

Also on:

I had been cultivating a fascination with Jekyll for blogging for a short while. It looked oh so clean, and minimalist, and sleek. It has its fans, for sure, and I am one of them.

If I were starting my blog from this day, I would almost certainly consider using Jekyll for it, rather than WordPress.

WordPress: better the devil?

But, I am not. Back in 2007 (can it really be so long ago?!), when I started blogging, I didn’t give much thought to my requirements eight years down the line. And the funny thing is, they have hardly changed.

Org2Blog is everything I need from blogging. It’s quick, because I can compose my text in Emacs, and also supply my category and tag information directly too.

When saving the post in Emacs, I can save a local copy using the same date-title-based file name schema that Jekyll would expect (e.g.: 2015-10-28-Assessing_Jekyll_as_an_alternative_blogging_platform.org).

Further benefits to Emacs/WordPress duality

Emacs Rocks.
Emacs Rocks.

As indicated by the previous filename example, blogs can be saved locally on my hard disk in Org-mode format, allowing me the option later on to convert everything for a Jekyll-based future. In other words, making the decision to hard-switch from one system or another need not be rushed and can, in fact, be assessed based on technical need.

Another “turn-off” from Jekyll is that, despite various attempts to make it easy to migrate WordPress posts, I found the process awkward and the documentation confusing. There is more than one way to skin this cat.
For me, Emacs provides such a comfortable environment using Org2Blog that it’s really hard to justify the alternative approaches of org-jekyll or Org+Jekyll.

Disadvantages to using WordPress

Well, it’s not elitest 😉

But aside from that, there are a few serious disadvantages. And these are ones you already know about: there’s lots of (potentially-vulnerable) PHP running, which is a security risk and also makes WordPress … slow.

Also, WordPress makes microblogging, or “notes” in IndieWeb parlance, not very easy. I want to publish my own microblog on my site and publish it elsewhere, but this will take futher investigation.

WordPress, also, has a reputation. It’s a bit like Walmart (or Asda in the UK). It’s a great, hulking CMS that everyone knows. It’s everywhere. Everyone uses it. Which means there’s less that’s “special” about it. And that’s a shame, because for all of that it’s really quite brilliant.

What WordPress gives me

Yoast SEO screenshot
Managing SEO settings per-post in WordPress

Like others, I’m a firm believer in the IndieWeb movement, but I don’t have enough time to write software for personal use right now. Luckily, many talented and dedicated individuals have stepped up and kindly donated their time and code to enable the IndieWeb on WordPress sites. This suits me down to the ground. At least I can support the movement by advocating and using their code.

WordPress also gives me flexibility. If I wish to write a short post about some coffee I’ve tried, I can. Picture too. If I wish to incorporate a video or music in a page fo rsome reason, the built-in editor makes that effortless. As it does, embedding a tweet too. WordPress is doing favours for the web at large, by keeping our writing options open and encouraging open sharing, rather than feeding us silo-centric drivel-data that we see so often from certain social networks!

One last thing WordPress gives is the ability for people who are not computer-confident to use a device like a Chromebook, or even their phone, and still provide a compelling and easy-to-use platform for sharing content.

There is a growing movement.  

The movement is towards a free web, unimpeded by the silos that threaten to own us, and liberated from social-networking norms that diminish our individuality.

And yet, there isn’t actually one movement; there’s two.  In fact, there are many more than two, but I’ll focus on just these for now.

 

Friendica

Friendica is a social networking platform which is decentralised, distributed and fully privacy-respecting.  It is, of course, open source too.  Friendica’s purpose is to be an ‘alternative to those “creepy” social networks that don’t really care about your privacy’.  It is primarily a web site with components that interact with other social networks (Facebook, Twitter, etc) as well as other instances of Friendica.

Friendica requires self-hosting.

 

Indieweb

Conversely, the “Indieweb” is more of a concept than a specific implementation.  Its guiding principle is that “When you post something on the web, it should belong to you, not a corporation.”  Although similar ideologically to Friendica, the implementation is less defined.  Some people have implemented it via WordPress plugins, others through Jekyll and other static blogging systems.

Indieweb’s principles can even be implemented in “closed” systems, provided the data can always be accessed by its owner.

 


A 200 word post.

Also on:

Jetpack's homepage is your standard, modern affair.
Jetpack’s homepage is your standard, cloudy affair.

If you are a blogger, and you use WordPress, you will undoubtedly heard of Jetpack Jetpack for WordPress provides a ton of enhancements to any WordPress install.   Among the goodies is something for the socialite in all of us: the ability to automatically “broadcast” our blog posts to social networks, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+, via the Publicize feature.

All this free stuff of course comes with a “price” – having a user account on WordPress.com itself.   But, if you are a blogger – or at the very least you read other people’s blogs and contribute comments – this is not exactly a hardship.

Set-up and Testing

Setting up Jetpack is as easy as installing a WordPress plug-in.  If you are familiar with the process, you will probably have already seen Jetpack in the Add Plugin page.

The Publicize feature is equally easy to set up:  you simply click on the button corresponding to the social network you wish to link with, a page/pop-up opens to allow you to authenticate with that social network, and then you return to the Publicize page with a “Connected as…” confirmatory message.

Jetpack confirming account connections.
Jetpack confirming account connections.

The next step is to write a post and then publish it.  Simple, huh?  Well, not quite.

Content Formatting

Due to the different ways social networks publish posts, your “write once, publish many” WordPress post may need a little tweaking before it looks as good as possible.

Google+

Image of G+ post
Google+ rendered my blog post with lots of #whitespace ! 😐

 

Facebook

 

Facebook produced a worthwhile post, with backlink.
Facebook produced a worthwhile post, with backlink.

Twitter

Twitter rendered my image sideways
Twitter did what it does best: stays brief

Links:

plus.google.com/+SteveDowe/posts/5eSkkPVLAfb

twitter.com/doweio/status/629950053499584512

Further Testing

Finding the most effective way to post requires more testing.  My main aim was to find a way in which one post can look great on the three main social platforms (Google+, Twitter and Facebook – not that I care too much about the latter).

[ This is a legacy-published post, originally written but unpublished on 13 August 2015.  Some details may not longer apply to recent software releases. ]